Imperfecto de Indicativo

¡Hola a todos!

This week, I’m back with a grammar topic: Spanish tenses. Specifically, we’re talking this week about the Indicative Imperfect past.

Let’s start with the form for the regular verbs:

 

But, how about the irregular verbs? Well, in this chart you can see the first person of the main irregular verbs (but they’re not all!). If you want to get the complete chart, you can have it here together with the other past tenses in Spanish.

 

And, when should we use the Imperfect in Spanish? Well, here’s a small list:

  • Continuous past actions.

Cuando era pequeña, iba a clases de inglés.

  • Past actions whose end is not clear.

Mi hermana estaba enferma.

  • Intentions and courtesy.

Buscaba un traje negro, por favor.

  • Stories and past narrations.

Iba caminando por la calle mientras veía el paisaje.

 

These are the main uses for the Imperfect in Spanish, but eventually you can face other situations, like indirect style or some conditional tenses.

 

I hope that you liked this post and that it’s been clear. All week long you will find some pictures on my Instagram and Facebook profiles to review and practice this, so if you don’t follow me yet, follow me now!

If you have any question about this, don’t hesitate to ask me. Remember that you can study Spanish online with me, you can ask for a 30 minutes free trial lesson, where we will get to know each other and start your Spanish adventure!

Also, if you like my job and you want to support me so I can keep sharing all this with you, kindly have a look to my Patreon page here.

¡Hasta la próxima!

Forges en clase de ELE

¡Hola, colegas!

Escribo rápidamente este post para compartir (otra vez) el podcast del jueves del equipo de Faro de Lenguas Magazine. En esta ocasión, hemos decidido dedicárselo a nuestro querido Forges.

Como sabéis, Forges fue un gran ilustrador, una figura cultural. Para gustos, los colores, pero sus contenidos no dejan de ser un material interesantísimo para llevar a nuestra clase de ELE y mostrar a nuestros alumnos la sociedad de hoy día de una forma más divertida que en un mero artículo de periódico.

En el podcast, podéis escuchar un poco de todo: la vida de Forges, cómo nos ha influido... Pero también podéis encontrar ideas para una explotación didáctica de sus viñetas en nuestras clases (sección llevada a cabo por Manuela Aparicio y por mí). Si os gustan estas ideas, podéis descargar una planificación didáctica completa aquí.

Espero que lo disfrutéis. ¡Hasta pronto!

Sentence order in Spanish

¡Hola a todos!

This week’s post is about something that many people usually ask me about: how to deal with the sentence order in Spanish.

We all know that many languages have closed structures and you can’t modify that grammar, but Spanish language is very flexible when talking about this. We do have a regular order for the sentences, but sometimes it may change. How? Let’s see it!

 

In affirmative sentences, the order will be subject + verb + objects.

Yo tengo una videoconsola en mi casa.

However, we can modify this order if we need to emphasize a specific object in the sentence, for example:

En mi casa tengo una videoconsola.

 

If we talk about negative sentences, we have two possible scenarios:

  • Using no, without any other adverb: we add no before the main verb. For example: No quiero ir al cine.
  • Using other negative adverb, like nada, ninguno, nadie… In this case, we need to use a double negation, using the structure no + verbo + nada/nadie… For example: No necesito nada, gracias.

 

Now, let’s see the interrogative sentences. We have two main types of interrogative sentences in Spanish: total and partial questions.

Starting with the total questions, they are the easiest to make, as the order will be the same than a regular affirmative sentence. For example:

Vamos al cine à ¿Vamos al cine?

The partial questions are those interrogative sentences where you ask for a specific information, so you can’t answer with yes/no. In this case, we will use the interrogative words like qué, quién, cómo… substituting the missing information, always at the beginning of the sentence. For example:

¿Qué quieres? Quiero una cámara de fotos.

¿Cuándo vamos al cine? Vamos al cine el domingo.

 

I hope that you liked this post and that it’s been clear. All week long you will find some pictures on my Instagram and Facebook profiles to review and practice this, so if you don’t follow me yet, follow me now!

If you have any question about this, don’t hesitate to ask me. Remember that you can study Spanish online with me, you can ask for a 30 minutes free trial lesson, where we will get to know each other and start your Spanish adventure!

¡Hasta la próxima!

Spanish Idioms with colours

¡Hola a todos!

As you know, I really like idioms, so today I’m giving you some Spanish idioms related to colors.

Are you ready?

Let’s go!

 

Rojo como un tomate

“Red as a tomato”, we use it when somebody blushes because of embarrassment. It could be the equivalent to “go red as a beetroot”.

¡Nunca había pasado tanta vergüenza! Me puse roja como un tomate.

 

Príncipe azul

The “Blue Prince” is that man every girl dreams about when we were kids. Now we all know they aren’t the same than we saw in Disney films, but still…

Era todo lo que siempre había soñado: guapo, simpático, bueno… Era su Príncipe Azul.

 

Prensa amarilla

The “yellow press” is the one using sensationalist headlines in order to attract people’s attention. It is known in English as gutter press.

Mira este periódico: inundación, secuestro… ¡solo les interesa la prensa amarilla!

 

Estar verde en un tema

We say that somebody “is green about something” when he doesn’t know pretty much about a specific topic.

Está todavía un poco verde, acaba de llegar y está aprendiendo.

 

De color de rosa

We use the idiom “in pink color” when talking in a very optimistic way. We can also use it in a pessimistic way if we use it like this: no todo es de color de rosa.

Está muy feliz, últimamente le va muy bien y lo ve todo de color de rosa.

 

Ponerse morado

“To get purple” means in Spanish to get filled up, when you’ve eaten too much and you can’t get even one more bite.

¡Cuánta comida! Me he puesto morado, no puedo ni moverme.

 

Verlo muy negro

This one is the opposite to the pink one, “to see it very black” means to be very pessimistic about something.

No me gusta esta situación, lo veo muy negro.

 

Quedarse en blanco

When you are white in Spanish, it means that you went blank, that you have no ideas left.

Me he quedado completamente en blanco, no recuerdo lo que tenía en mente.

 

Tener/comerse un marrón

If you “have or eat a brown” in Spanish, run away because you have a problem. Tener un marrón is that you have a problem, but comerse un marrón means that you pay for the consequences of that problem.

Mi amigo salió corriendo y me comí yo todo el marrón.

 

Media naranja

Okay, this one makes reference to the fruit, but it’s also a color, so I include it here! When we talk in Spanish about our “half orange” we talk about our soulmate.

He salido con muchas personas, pero ninguna era mi media naranja.

 

Do you know other Spanish idioms with colors? Let me know if you want me to publish the second part of this post!

 

I hope that you liked it and that it’s been clear. All week long you will find some pictures on my Instagram and Facebook profiles to review this, so if you don’t follow me yet, follow me now!

If you have any question about this, don’t hesitate to ask me. Remember that you can study Spanish online with me, you can ask for a 30 minutes free trial lesson, where we will get to know each other and start your Spanish adventure!

¡Hasta la próxima!

Dieresis in Spanish

¡Hola a todos!

This week I’m talking about an orthographic topic: the diaeresis or dieresis. Let’s be a bit technical: in Linguistics, the dieresis is a diacritical mark consisting in two dots used over a vowel. The dieresis we have in Spanish will always be over the u, so: ü.

But it is a diacritical mark, as we said, so we don’t always need the dieresis over the letter u. Then, when do we use it?

In Spanish, we use the dieresis on the syllables gue, gui when the “u” must be pronounced, in words like ambigüedad or pingüino.

If we don’t use the dieresis, words will be pronounced in different ways, and this may cause a situation where we’ll be pronouncing a word that doesn’t exist.

 

Exercise: can you send me a message with words using dieresis in Spanish?

 

I hope that you liked this very short post and that it’s been clear. All week long you will find some pictures on my Instagram and Facebook profiles to review and practice this, so if you don’t follow me yet, follow me now!

If you have any question about this, don’t hesitate to ask me. Remember that you can study Spanish online with me, you can ask for a 30 minutes free trial lesson, where we will get to know each other and start your Spanish adventure!

¡Hasta la próxima!